Georgia Tribuiani

APIECE APART WOMAN
Georgia Tribuiani starts our conversation, “I was born and raised in a small town in Italy on the Adriatic Sea”…and we’re hooked. Today, Georgia’s far away from the Mediterranean, but the influence permeates: by day she works in the film industry as a internationally-recognized, diversely-talented director, but balances her role in the digital world with And So It Goes, a line of handmade fisherman’s net bags inspired by childhoods on the coasts of Italy. Her Elysian Park house feels equally like another world in the middle of Los Angeles — filled with natural light that leaks in from unexpected places, it’s a warm yet contemporary escape we wouldn’t mind retreating to.

 
What are you working on right now?
I’m finishing up a short fashion film that I shot with my friend, photographer Stefano Galli. We had talked a lot about collaborating on a non-narrative film inspired by the work of artists that we love, like the landscape films of James Benning and the photography of Luigi Ghirri. So when this project came along we felt that this was the perfect opportunity to shoot something together. As an ongoing project I’m also working on a video interview series. I want to document people and subject matter that interests me or that I find inspiring. I'm planning on working with artists from a variety of disciplines, but instead of classic artist profiles I want to focus on one aspect of their work or capture something that I've learned from them.
 
How did the idea for And So It Goes originate?
I love to keep myself involved with tactile work. I have always many projects on the table. Fishnetting was something that I learned growing up in Italy…as kids we used fishnets to play. My friend Clarice and I wanted to design a product that could serve a good cause. At the time, both San Francisco and Los Angeles were going to ban plastic bags, so we were inspired to redesign the classic net bag and to donate part of the profits to the Clean Ocean Project.

Georgia wears BI-LEVEL NAVONA DRESS

Your work seems split between things that are driven by concept work, and then the utter tactility of And So It Goes. Can you share more about the roles each play for you?
I don't feel that there is a separation between the two in the way I work. They are more like tools I have, but they are not necessarily the defining characteristic of the work. I like to be hands on and expand my knowledge, and in that way I feel that I can get closer to what I envisioned at the start. Drawing, sculpture, collage, photography, video — all these are ways that I can generate ideas in my problem-solving process. Even if it’s digital work I always start with a sketch on paper or with a paper cutout.
 
 "I like to be hands on and expand my knowledge, and in that way I feel that I can get closer to what I envisioned at the start. Drawing, sculpture, collage, photography, video — all these are ways that I can generate ideas in my problem-solving process. "
 
A great artist gets inspiration from anywhere — what are some of the most unusual sources of inspiration for you?
Staring at empty walls, cleaning drawers, and cutting paper shapes.
 
What’s the most exciting thing you’ve recently discovered?
A real Italian deli 15 minutes from my house.
 

 
What are you serious about?
Food.
 
What things will you never take seriously?
Sports.
 
Can you share the schedule of a typical day in the life?
I have a daily routine that is pretty standard but my morning rituals are never quite the same. A new one is that I've been shooting short videos that may not turn into anything, they are more like sketches in motion. I feel it’s important to have fun and not necessarily know a final destination. Those ideas always turn out to be useful.
 
"I feel it’s important to have fun and not necessarily know a final destination. Those ideas always turn out to be useful."

 

Georgia wears SHIRRED AGATA and TAIYANA WIDE LEG PANT

What objects have been most significant to you lately?
Chairs! Recently I’ve been sketching and making miniature prototypes of chairs. The inspiration came from reading the ironic project Ricerca della comodità in una poltrona scomoda (Seeking comfort in an uncomfortable chair) by Bruno Munari. I also love Donald Judd's furniture design and a recent addition to our place is a beautiful chair by Shin Okuda.
 
What was the best recent conversation you’ve had?
I just had a very long interesting conversation with Matthew Sullivan, a LA-based furniture designer. He has an amazing point of view and background. While speaking with him it just clicked for me that he should be one of the subjects of my interview project. The project is a great excuse to go have conversations with interesting people.
 

 
Please describe your last month in a word.
Kinetic!
 
What do you make for a dinner party? Can you share the menu?
It depends on the season, but usually it starts with bresaola, arugula, and parmigiano and it ends with affogato al caffé.
 
What do you make for dinner alone?
My comfort food is bread, olive oil, tomatoes, and prosciutto.
 

 

georgiatribuiani.com

Photography by LAURE JOLIET | Words by LEIGH PATTERSON